Instant Udon!

2011-03-23 12:24

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I went by 7-Eleven yesterday to buy some instant ramen (because I was really hungry and I knew I needed to eat more since I've been losing a lot of weight recently. 8D;;) and I realized that they had a new product next to the Cup Noodles: IT WAS INSTANT KITSUNE UDON!! (You have no idea how fat I feel for blogging about food right now...)

Kitsune Udon literally translates into "Fox Udon" and it is basically topped with Wakame (seaweed) and Aburaage (Japanese sweetened deep-fried tofu), which absorbs the soup and is actually quite tasty. According to various sources online, it is in Japanese belief that Japanese foxes like eating Aburaage, thus the name Kitsune Udon.

I've actually had my share of instant udon just a few months ago when I discovered and bought some bowls at the local Japanese supermarket here in Hong Kong called Jusco. I was just really surprised that 7-Eleven was beginning to sell them too. I don't recall them having them in stock previously. It makes my Japanese-food-cravings easier to soothe, I suppose. Maybe that's why I'm so happy. :D

So how exactly do you cook instant udon? Simple, really.

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(This is actually a picture of my previous bowl of instant ramen from a few months ago. I didn't get to take a picture of the contents of the bowl I had yesterday.)
After opening the bowl up, you'll see the contents. Food items included are usually a pack of udon, soup base and other toppings. The bowl includes Instructions are usually included at the bottom of the cover of the bowl, which you will see after taking/peeling it off. A sort of strainer is also included and the design of this strainer differs between bowls (the two I've encountered are the one in the picture and another that basically looks like a cover that you can put on and has litle slits for the water to pass through when you tilt the bowl over).

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Firstly, you're supposed to cook the udon by opening the pack up, putting it in the bowl then adding hot water. After the noodles become soft and are broken away from each other, you strain the water out completely.

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You're now ready to add all the other stuff on it (soup base and toppings).

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All you have to do now is add hot water and then you're done! Simple, quick and easy! This is why I love Japanese products! xD


Tokyo Banana

2011-03-08 09:10

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When I visited Japan two years ago with my family, we came across a few little stores at Tokyo Station, right after we got off the Shinkansen and were heading towards the train that would take us to Shinjuku. We had just finished visiting Mount Fuji and Mount Komagatake in Hakone.

As a person who loves eating bananas, I stopped at the Tokyo Banana store and started staring at all the different banana-snacks they sold, not knowing that Tokyo Banana was actually an iconic souvenir snack of the city. Like a spoiled little child with no money at hand, I pointed at the banana tart and asked my mom if we could buy it. Saying that I loved the tart would be an understatement; I melted while eating it. The rich flavour of the banana was circulating throughout my mouth and the freshness sent shivers down my spine (okay, so I might be exaggerating but that's how much I loved it).

Fast forward to a few weeks back: a friend of ours, who is a flight attendant, was having a flight to Tokyo and asked if we wanted anything. My mother, knowing well that I loved Tokyo Banana and had been craving for some ever since our trip to Japan, immediately told our friend about it.

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We met with her at church the next week and she gave us two boxes of Tokyo Banana. These were bought from the Tokyo airport and are actually little cakes (twinkies?) that have a creamy banana paste in the middle. It's too bad I had to finish all of it within a week because that's how long until the snack expires to guarantee the freshness of the banana inside.

I would have loved to keep it for a longer time just so I can satisfy my craving for it once in a while, but I guess I'll have to wait until our friend or my family goes back to Tokyo to try out the other Tokyo Banana products.

Time to wait.